People, Uncategorized

Tonsil Surgery and The Blue Doll

My own short story:
When I was in hospital, as a child at age-five, having my tonsils out, my dad brought me a doll that was completely and totally ‘blue’ in color; blue hair, blue clothes, blue accessories. I was lying in the hospital bed, feeling next to dead, when Dad popped this doll up next to me over the bd railing.
He said, “Since you have to be here, I bought “someone” to be “blue” with you. I’ll never forget it.
Daddy always brought me dolls…or M&Ms…or comic books from our newsstand. (grins)

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People, Uncategorized

Short Story: A/C Repair Service Call – Galveston, Texas

Short Story –

Galveston West Isle has very nice high-dollar homes on the Gulf of Mexico. My electrician friend received an A/C service call to a home (excuse me, uh, mansion), and arrived to find the gentleman caller sitting in a rocking chair, up 40 steps, waiting on the veranda porch. Long hair, blue jeans. He was patiently waiting. My friend walked up, introduced himself, and proceeded with his service call, being let in to work, and spent ten minutes being shown around a very large house. Big house, big area, the two gentleman walked the house together. An hour went by.
 
As my friend was leaving, he says to the client, “Are you Galveston, because I think you are very familiar to me.” Client says no, he’s just house-sitting. “But, you ARE someone I know, right?” The client replied, “Could be. My name is Willie.” My friend was thunderstruck and he nearly fainted. He had just met, and shaken hands, with Willie Nelson.
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People, Uncategorized

The Blue Doll From Daddy

My own short story:
When I was in hospital, having my tonsils out as a child, when my dad brought me a doll that was completely and totally ‘blue’ in color. blue hair, blue clothes, blue accessories.
I was lying in the hospital bed, feeling next to dead, when Dad popped this doll up next to me.
He said, “Since you have to be here, I bought “someone” to be ‘blue’ with you”. I’ll never forget it.
Daddy always brought me dolls…or M&Ms…or comic books from our newsstand. (grins)
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People

My Neighbor, Louise Was Not There – Galveston, Texas – 1982

I was living in a one hundred year old house, with a 90-year-old lady in the apartment on the side. Actually, the house was moved on its spot more than one hundred years ago. It occurred after The Great Storm of 1900. My landlord leased to me as a single lady, and then brought Ms. Louise to rent to small apartment. He said, as he came up the back stairs with her, arm in arm, “I hope you two single ladies can / will look after each other. At the rental office, we felt as though you two could want to be together.” They made a good match in us two.
We shared the back porch. She had asked if I would please come if I heard her knocking on the wall and I promised I would. I came home one night and, ummmm, toiletting, I heard her signal knock on my bathroom wall that connects us together.
It was twice before I could get done. Twice, the exact signal knock. I ran right to her door, pulling at my clothes. I knocked, knocked, called, called. Dark and no answer.
Okay, she’s 90, right. So I decide to break in the window. I’ve got a good reason to break the window; after all, I ‘psychically’ know, by ‘psychic’ signal, that I just need to break this window, officer. Scouting the best window, I found one unlocked and went inside a very dark, spooky, after-dark, no electricity on, shadowy apartment. The bedroom window was open, the curtains were blowing into my face, blowing everywhere. The curtains made my breathe stop and nearly scared me to death.
I called her, I called her, I searched everywhere there a little old 90-year-old lady could fit. I wasn’t giving up because she needed help.
But, minutes were going by, I’m frantically searching. There are no answers to my calls, (‘Jeez, Louise’), nor my finding her. I was stunned. By the last looking-place, I was ever so confused. She just WAS NOT there.
Now, I did mention the curtains blowing in the windy night, the fact there was no lights (power wasn’t on, hmmmm). I couldn’t figure it out. I decided to call the landlord the next day and have them come in the daylight and look with me. But, she WAS NOT there and the holidays interrupted my calling the rental office.
I waited. Sometimes, I held my cat and stared at her door off my bedroom window. Her light didn’t come on. Her things were there, no one had come, surely, surely, she hadn’t passed away. I would feel alone with my cat, sorry she wasn’t there today, or that day. I realized I liked her ever so much.
I slept in the day each day, and by evening that seventh day, Louise’s front door was open. I was shaking as I went out and came around to her door. I was afraid. Yes, afraid. I just mentally pictured one of her relatives answering and coming to the door, to say Louise at 90 years young, had passed on. But … my croaking, “Louise?”, brought her voice back to me, “Come on in, Honey.”
Seven days later, she came home. She had been in the hospital. She said she was trying to tell me, from the hospital, that she wasn’t there, that she knew what time I went to work at night and what time I came home in the morning. She wanted me to, “know that  she wanted badly for me to know”.
I told her my story. That, yes, she “reached” me. And that, yes, I did know.
Hmmmm.
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People

Jodi Foster – The Coppertone Child

 
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Some many years ago, on interview talk show, Jodie Foster admitted she was this model at 3-years-old. She said she posed the pose, but that the painter did not a dog, or a tree, or a beach. That the painter used her pose.
Later, some years later, she admitted this on TV again. That she was this model, and that no, and in no way, did she suffer trauma for “modelling the pose”.
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People

NO Idea – 1939 – Daddy’s Car

My dad once told me that in 1939, he was 18 years old, and he bought his first car; it was a NEW car. He paid cash, the whole $100.00, on the spot.
At this point of the story, my dad roared back laughing. It was so funny to him to tell me he had had to park that new car for nine months, covered up,because he didn’t have $.06, and nowhere to get $.06, for a gallon of gas, so that he could try driving it.
To write further, Dad went into the military shortly after this purchase, and came back
with money for gasoline…nine months later.
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People

The “Vet”

Short story.
One of the years I painted scenery for theatre tech, I worked
with a part-time, non-paid they always called, “The Vet.”
For tools, it was, “Go ask the vet”.
So, at one time I asked him, “What was our branch of service?”
He was so surprised, he stumbled. He said, “I’m not a veteran;
I’m a veternarian.”
We all laughed about that.
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